Tuesday, April 1, 2014

Increasingly rotten service and theft by the USPS (US Postal Service)

http://www.democratic-republicans.us/english/english-increasingly-rotten-service-and-theft-by-the-usps-us-postal-service

..Totally “unsat” performance by the US Postal Service

And it caused suffering.
I had to repay a $500 personal loan to a friend and comrade who is living on social security and he really needed the money back. So I sent a check on Monday to him in Kingsport, Tennessee by registered mail, which cost me a whopping $12.44. It should have been there by Thursday at the very latest. (It is only 410 miles.) Really, it should have been there by Wednesday.
Here is a scan of the receipt, with the name and address of the recipient whited out by me.
receipt-usps-registered-march-2014
On Friday, the 28th, however, it was still not delivered, and so I called the USPS at the number 1-800-222-1811 and gave them the tracking number for the letter, and was told it was still in Memphis, Tennessee, where it had arrived on the 25th, at the wrong end of Tennessee, at the sorting facility…. and was sitting there. This is what I got for my $12.44. It sat in Memphis for three days.
Totally unsat — under Obama, postal service has become as Third World as he is. And my friend suffered because of it. How are we going to compete with China, Japan and Germany with the USPS’ sit-on-its-butt laziness? And I paid $12.44 for this!
And now some other recent USPS horror stories:
Twice over the last twelve months the USPS has lost letters sent to me containing postal money orders.
I had to use my time and gas to drive to the post office, then fill out a long refund form, and then pay a $6 refund fee — and then I had to wait a whopping sixty days to get a refund — after THEY lost it! Twice in 12 months!
Example of an actual USPS money order which was sent to me as a donation.
5-dollar-usps-money-order
Worst of all, a postmaster recently deliberately shorted me by ten dollars on change. I gave him a $20 when buying a book of stamps, and he gave me change for a $10! When I confronted him, in front of other customers, he just quietly pulled another ten out of the cash register drawer, all quiet and hush-hush. Now this is a white man with blue eyes…… America is going to hell and fast when a small-white-town, white postmaster is stealing from regular customers that he knows.
A Swedish comrade living in Tennessee wrote me:
 It could have been done deliberately — deliberate bad quality, so they can say “we must privatize mail service to get better quality.”
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They did mail privatization in Sweden and it has been catastrophic! Doubly expensive and half as efficient! It’s the Jews who do the privatizing and Jews who get the contract!
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And it bothers me that my friend who lent me $500 short-term did not get his money back that he needed — when he needed it. In turn, he and I spent time on the phone, I spent time on the phone with the USPS, I had to scan in the receipt for him to prove I had sent the money as promised, because he had briefly become upset with me that he had not gotten his urgently needed money on the date promised. All this was due to lazy-ass service.
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Another comrade wrote:
Blame postal unions that endorsed Obama and stand behind lazy postal workers.
A comrade asked me:
What other ways do you have to send money? Western Union?
I replied:
Yes, and MoneyGram. Of course, one can pay through the nose and use Federal Express for $17.99, since a normal letter with a 45-cent stamp on it may well be lost by our US Postal Dis-Service.
From Facebook:
  • Lars Lindeberg Again it’s this privatization — everything is for profit at any cost, even if you have to prostitute your mother!
    36 MINS · Unlike · 2
  • Chuck Stillman Lars is absolutely right. I worked for the PO for 38 years. Top-heavy, inept managers are the real problem, NOT your mail carrier. MIS-management is rampant, and service sucks.
    2 MINS · Unlike · 1
  • Chuck Stillman They do want to privatize it with UPS. [Republican US Congressm and vice-presidential candidate in 2012] Paul Ryan and his wife are UPS lobbyists who stand to make a bundle if it’s ever privatized.
    Look at this snake-oil salesman.
    Paul-Ryan-WANTS-TO-PRIVATIZE-USPS-WITH-UPS
    1 MIN · Like
  • John D. Nugent Thanks for this comment, Chuck. I agree, having found myself that most mail carriers themselves are nice, pleasant, honest and hard-working.
    40 SECS · Like · 1
Back before the total Jew takeover of OUR country, the US Post Office (its original name) was a proud  and reliable institution.
Postal Service Mission and “Motto”
The United States Postal Service is an independent establishment of the Executive Branch of the Government of the United States [it serves under the President of the United States] and operates in a business-like way. Its mission statement can be found
in Section 101(a) of Title 39 of the U.S. Code, also known as the Postal Reorganization Act:
The Postal Service shall have as its basic function the obligation to provide postal services to bind the Nation together through the personal, educational, literary, and business correspondence of the people. It shall provide prompt, reliable, and efficient services to patrons in all areas and shall render postal services to all communities.
“Motto” of the Postal Service:

Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night stays these couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds.

While the Postal Service has no official motto, the popular belief that it does is a tribute to America’s postal workers. The words above, thought to be the motto, are chiseled in gray granite over the entrance to the New York City Post Office on 8th Avenue and come from Book 8, Paragraph 98, of The Persian Wars by Herodotus. During the wars between the Greeks and Persians (500-449 B.C.), the Persians operated a system of mounted postal couriers who served with great fidelity.
The firm of McKim, Mead & White designed the New York General Post Office, which opened to the public on Labor Day in 1914. One of the firm’s architects, William Mitchell Kendall, was the son of a classics scholar and read Greek for pleasure. He selected the “Neither snow nor rain . . .” inscription, which he modified from a translation by Professor George Herbert Palmer of Harvard University, and the Post Office Department approved it.
neither-snow-nor-rain-ny-post-office-inscription
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The New York City main post office in Manhattan
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nyc-post-office
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…. The American genius who was the first postmaster

Benjamin Franklin, First Postmaster General

Born in Boston in 1706, Benjamin Franklin left school at age 10 to work in his father’s candle shop.9 In 1718, Franklin apprenticed to his brother James, a printer and founder of Boston’s New England Courant. Franklin read voraciously, contributed anonymous articles to his brother’s newspaper, and managed the paper while his brother was imprisoned for a political offense. At 17, Franklin ran away and ended up in Philadelphia, where he found work as a printer. Franklin started his own print shop by 1728 and purchased The Pennsylvania Gazette. His wildly successful Poor Richard’s Almanack secured his fortune.
1954-franklin-half-dollar
Postal Career Begins
Franklin was appointed postmaster of Philadelphia by the British Crown Post in 1737. Newspaper publishers often served as postmasters, which helped them to gather and distribute news. Postmasters decided which newspapers could travel free in the mail — or in the mail at all.
Postmaster General Elliott Benger added to Franklin’s duties by making him comptroller, with financial oversight for nearby Post Offices. Franklin lobbied the British to succeed Benger when his health failed and, with Virginia’s William Hunter, was named joint postmaster general for the Crown on August 10, 1753.
benjamin-franklin
Franklin surveyed post roads and Post Offices, introduced a simple accounting method for postmasters, and had riders carry mail both night and day. He encouraged postmasters to establish the penny post where letters not called for at the Post Office were delivered for a penny. Remembering his experience with the Gazette, Franklin mandated delivery of all newspapers for a small fee. His efforts contributed to the Crown’s first North American profit in 1760.
In 1757, while serving as joint postmaster general, Franklin went to London to represent Pennsylvania’s government. In 1763, back in the colonies, he traveled 1,600 miles surveying post roads and Post Offices from Virginia to New England.
In 1764, Franklin returned to London, where he represented the interests of several colonial governments. In 1774, judged too sympathetic to the colonies, he was dismissed as joint postmaster general.
First Postmaster General under the Continental Congress
Back on American soil in 1775, Franklin served as a member of the Second Continental Congress, which appointed him Postmaster General on July 26 of that year. With an annual salary of $1,000 and $340 for a secretary and comptroller, Franklin was responsible for all Post Offices from Massachusetts to Georgia and had authority to hire postmasters as necessary.
Founding Father of a New Nation
In 1776, Franklin worked with the committee that created the Declaration of Independence, then left for Paris to secure French support for the war with England. The treaty of alliance he negotiated in 1778 was vital to the success of the American Revolution. Later, Franklin helped negotiate the peace treaty with Great Britain.
benjamin-franklin-join-or-dieFranklin returned to Philadelphia in 1785. He attended the Constitutional Convention in 1787 and lived to see the Constitution adopted. He died April 17, 1790.
Franklin was a man of many talents. He helped establish a library, fire company, academy, philosophical society, militia, hospital, and better streets and street lighting in Philadelphia. His scientific contributions included a study of electricity and lightning, theories of heat absorption, measurement of the Gulf Stream, and invention of the lightning rod, bifocals, and the Franklin stove.
Biographer Carl Van Doren wrote:
In any age, in any place, Franklin would have been great … (N)umerous as his achievements were, they were less than he was.10

1 comment:

  1. Is it any wonder the way things are going in this country and the totally complete failure of prosecutions unless the prosecutors and judges are trying to make a name for themselves. I have seen criminals skate on their activities time and again and when they are finally prosecuted then you find out they have a vary lengthy criminal f=history..The country is in shreds and criminals keep doing it.

    ReplyDelete